IRANIAN – EGYPTIAN CONNECTION

Our headlines are dominated these days by IRAN and other countries in the MIDDLE EAST – most of the news is about war, how to avoid it or accelerate it. But in one of Cairo’s Mosques, the Al-Rifa’i Mosque, built between 1869 AND 1912,

Al-Rifa'i Mosque

Al-Rifa’i Mosque in Cairo

we find testimony of touching human story —— the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi is buried here, right next to King Farouk, the  last King of Egypt.

Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi

Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi

When in 1979, after the revolution the Shah had to leave Iran,  already a sick man suffering from gallstones,  he traveled from country to country seeking temporary residence and medical help. In October of 1979 President Jimmy Carter reluctantly allowed the Shah into the United States to undergo surgical treatment.

He left the United States in December of 1979. In the Shah’s memoir “Answer to History” he claimed that he never received any kind of health care while in the United Sates, but was asked to leave the country. He went to Panama, where his presence caused riots, and fearing extradition to Tehran he accepted Anwar El-Sadat’s offer for permanent asylum. He died in Egypt on July 27, 1980 age 60.

As the former brother-in-law of Kind Farouk – the Shah’s first marriage was to Princess Fawzia, King Farouk’s sister – Anwar El-Sadat Sadat gave him a state funeral.

Shah of Iran’ Tomb

When we were  standing in front of his tomb in the Al Rifa’i Mosque, very close to King Farouk’s tomb, my guide said:

“In  Egypt we have always regarded the Shah of Iran as part of our history.”

More from Egypt soon

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Brigitte

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About Brigitte Nioche

Author of Living Longer, Living Well - How to Embrace the Challenges of a Long Life. Other titles - Dress to Impress, The Sensual Dresser, What Turns Men On.
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2 Responses to IRANIAN – EGYPTIAN CONNECTION

  1. Peggy Anne Lyman says:

    Thank you. Very interesting.

    Like

  2. Peggy Anne Lyman says:

    Thank you for this very interesting bit of history.

    When I go to,post a comment, the last line sakes me to give a website. I do not know what that means.

    Looking forward to our adventure together. Have a nice day.

    Cheers.

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

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